Facebook Recipes

Anyone who has been on FB has been bound to see all different recipes that are posted. I, as well as some of my friends, are guilty of reposting these recipes.The premise is if you save it to your Facebook wall, you will have saved the recipe so you can have it.The recipe that I actually did was the chocolate/peanut butter”crack” brownies.It was an invitation, as I tagged it on Facebook,to insulin use, IMHO.What I decided to do was not make the “crack”part.
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I started by making regular brownies from a regular mix:nothing really fancy.Prepare the mix according to the directions on the box.We tend to like fudge-like brownies, so I followed that direction, but there is always the decision for cake like brownies. It’s all spelled out on the box.
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While they are baking, I unwrapped recess’ peanut butter mini cups, and cut them in halves, then quarters.When you pull the brownies out, you sprinkle the peanut butter cup pieces over the hot brownies, and then throw them back in the oven for five minutes.
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The peanut butter cups will be soft, so I just used my spatula to smooth it over the brownies.You can see the chocolate sink into the brownies.I then set them aside and let them cool.Now the Facebook recipe will have you melting chocolate chips and then stirring in rice cereal.Well, bad enough I am making the recipe.For us, we just didn’t need the over the edge amount of chocolate.It’s your call.If you opt for that, all you do is melt chips in the microwave and then stir in the cereal.Then you are supposed to ice the brownies you have made and put in the refrigerator to cool.

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The last picture is what’s left of the brownies, thus the dirty plate! You can see how the peanut butter worked its’ way into the brownie and the chocolate.This was one case of doing half of the recipe rocked!

Valentine’s Week

We’re at the point of our relationship that I am not looking for anything for Valentines’day,nor am I expecting anything on that day, but there is nothing wrong with sharing the love with my neighbors.

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What can be more loving than an Oreo Biscotti? Oven 350 degrees-yields 28 cookies

Here’s the recipe:
1 cup sugar
1⁄3 cup butter, melted
3 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3 cups flour
1 1⁄2 teaspoons baking powder
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
16 Oreo cookies, coarsely chopped
2 ounces semisweet chocolate or 2 ounces white chocolate, melted

Beat sugar, butter, eggs and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer at medium speed until blended.
Stir in flour, baking powder and salt.
Fold in chopped cookies.
Divide mixture in half.
With floured hands, shape each half into a 9×3-inch loaf on a lightly greased large baking sheet.
Bake at 350° for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown and toothpick inserted in the centers come out clean.
Remove from oven; cool for 10 minutes.
Cut each loaf diagonally into 15 (1/2-inch thick) slices.
Place slices, cut side up, on same baking sheet.
Bake for 10 to 12 minutes more on each side or until lightly toasted.

Drizzle the tops with melted chocolate.Myself? Nah, I’ll take them straight, with a coffee chaser!

Enjoy and share the love!

Company’s coming

Trying to get the house cleaned, do some wash,walk the girls , do a little baking…we are going out tonight!  

I tripled the biscotti dough to make enough for everyone.They just came out of the oven now. I found a big Tupperware container to store them in, although by the time I distribute them, I might need a smaller container.

  
 
It’s a nice day here, but getting windy. I am meeting up tonight with a former co-worker and her husband for dinner. It’s going to be nice to talk after all these years.

Enjoy your weekend!

Armageddon,no Snowageddon

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So I went with my neighbor to the market today, and the above shot was only part of the melee at the bakery section. I seriously shudder to think what the rest of the market looked like,as the “Snowaggedon”, as opposed to Armageddon was coming.Never mind that if you actually paid attention to the weather forecast, you would have learned that yes, we would get snow,but it would be warm enough to turn from snow to sleet to rain.

WHY WAS EVERYONE IN THE MARKET? RAIN, FOLKS,RAIN……..

We had strip steak for dinner, to celebrate the snow that will be short-lived,and get ready for the nor’easter that will be in our midst.

If you are out there where there is actually snow, well, be safe. If you are down here with me in the nor’easter, be safe.

Let’s just all make it through the weekend in one piece, ok!

Eggs? Bread? Milk?….

There has been no snow alert, but something in my recent swing of watching Cutthroat Kitchen and the Food Network has made me decide to set myself up for baking.

In addition, I am preparing for my return to work, and there is something in getting ready that screamed baking to me.In a recent post that I had the vanilla biscotti recipe listed, well, I figure I might throw another batch or two together to keep in Tupperware for a quick morning or afternoon fix.I have a tendency, when I do this recipe, to give some to our neighbors, who are greatly appreciative of them, so there’ll be some for them, and some to stash away.

I find myself laughing as I type this, because I am no longer in the big city, but old habits die hard.Maybe it’s the old girl scout in me.Perhaps it’s the fact that I know it’s not even mid-January yet.

Snow.

I know you’re coming.

So at the risk of repeating myself, here’s my vanilla biscotti recipe that I found on the Food Website.Enjoy!

SERVINGS
36
YIELD
3 dozen biscotti
UNITS
US
6 tablespoons butter
2⁄3 cup sugar
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
1 -2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1⁄2 teaspoons baking powder
2 large eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 350°F Lightly grease (or line with parchment) one large (about 18″ x 13″) baking sheet.
In a medium-sized bowl, beat the butter, sugar, salt, vanilla, and baking powder until the mixture is smooth and creamy. Beat in the eggs; the batter may look slightly curdled. At low-speed of your mixer, add the flour, stirring until smooth; the dough will be sticky.
Plop the dough onto the prepared baking sheet. Shape it into a log that’s about 14″ long x 2 ½” wide x ¾” thick. Straighten the log, and smooth its top and sides; a wet spatula or wet bowl scraper works well here. Note: For extra-long, bistro-style biscotti, pat the dough into a lightly greased 12″ x 5 1/2″ biscotti pan.
Bake the dough for 25 minutes. Remove it from the oven, and allow it to cool on the pan anywhere from 10 to 25 minutes; just work it into the schedule of whatever else you’re doing in the kitchen. Using a spray bottle filled with room-temperature water, lightly but thoroughly spritz the log, making sure to cover the sides as well as the top. Softening the crust just this little bit will make slicing the biscotti much easier.
Reduce the oven temperature to 325°F Wait another 5 minutes, then use a serrated knife to cut the log crosswise into 1″-2″” slices. Or cut the biscotti on the diagonal—for fewer, longer biscotti. As you’re slicing, be sure to cut straight up and down, perpendicular to the pan; if you cut unevenly, biscotti may be thicker at the top than the bottom, and they’ll topple over during their second bake.
Set the biscotti on edge on the prepared baking sheet. Return the biscotti to the oven, and bake them for 25 to 30 minutes, till they feel very dry and are beginning to turn golden. They’ll still feel a tiny bit moist in the very center, if you break off a piece; but they’ll continue to dry out as they cool. Remove the biscotti from the oven, and transfer them to a rack to cool.
Variations: Add up to 2 cups nuts, dried fruit (dried, not fresh), or chips to the dough, along with the flour. Adjust the spice to suit the add-in, if desired; e.g., add 1 teaspoon cinnamon with 1 cup chopped dried apple and 1 cup diced pecans. Or substitute hazelnut, butter-rum, or your favorite flavor for the vanilla. A classic Italian anise biscotti is made with 1/2 teaspoon anise extract (or 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon anise oil, to taste), and 1 tablespoon fennel seeds.

Enjoy!

Milestone

Down here in “Amity”, as I like to call it, I went to a 90th birthday party today for a good friend of mine.

Vivian has been so kind to me for the past six years I have known her. She collects the money at the pancake breakfast. Always,Vivian has a kind word for everyone. 

 
She’s the one with the grey hair and pearls. She try to help fellow knitter and crocheters as best as she can.She is always amazing to talk to in a coversation. One day when I grow up, I want to be just like her!

   
    
 
Here are some shots that before hand, would have had Martha Stewart smiling.

Happy birthday Vivian! I love you!

Vanilla Biscotti- from Food website

My brother-in law makes biscotti and gives them out at Christmastime. I am a purist who enjoys anything vanilla.

I have made these twice now and boy are they good! I figured I’d share the recipe. I gave a few of my friends trial bags and they said they were pretty good.

SERVINGS
36
YIELD
3 dozen biscotti
UNITS
US
6 tablespoons butter
2⁄3 cup sugar
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
1 -2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1⁄2 teaspoons baking powder
2 large eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 350°F Lightly grease (or line with parchment) one large (about 18″ x 13″) baking sheet.
In a medium-sized bowl, beat the butter, sugar, salt, vanilla, and baking powder until the mixture is smooth and creamy. Beat in the eggs; the batter may look slightly curdled. At low-speed of your mixer, add the flour, stirring until smooth; the dough will be sticky.
Plop the dough onto the prepared baking sheet. Shape it into a log that’s about 14″ long x 2 ½” wide x ¾” thick. Straighten the log, and smooth its top and sides; a wet spatula or wet bowl scraper works well here. Note: For extra-long, bistro-style biscotti, pat the dough into a lightly greased 12″ x 5 1/2″ biscotti pan.
Bake the dough for 25 minutes. Remove it from the oven, and allow it to cool on the pan anywhere from 10 to 25 minutes; just work it into the schedule of whatever else you’re doing in the kitchen. Using a spray bottle filled with room-temperature water, lightly but thoroughly spritz the log, making sure to cover the sides as well as the top. Softening the crust just this little bit will make slicing the biscotti much easier.
Reduce the oven temperature to 325°F Wait another 5 minutes, then use a serrated knife to cut the log crosswise into 1″-2″” slices. Or cut the biscotti on the diagonal—for fewer, longer biscotti. As you’re slicing, be sure to cut straight up and down, perpendicular to the pan; if you cut unevenly, biscotti may be thicker at the top than the bottom, and they’ll topple over during their second bake.
Set the biscotti on edge on the prepared baking sheet. Return the biscotti to the oven, and bake them for 25 to 30 minutes, till they feel very dry and are beginning to turn golden. They’ll still feel a tiny bit moist in the very center, if you break off a piece; but they’ll continue to dry out as they cool. Remove the biscotti from the oven, and transfer them to a rack to cool.
Variations: Add up to 2 cups nuts, dried fruit (dried, not fresh), or chips to the dough, along with the flour. Adjust the spice to suit the add-in, if desired; e.g., add 1 teaspoon cinnamon with 1 cup chopped dried apple and 1 cup diced pecans. Or substitute hazelnut, butter-rum, or your favorite flavor for the vanilla. A classic Italian anise biscotti is made with 1/2 teaspoon anise extract (or 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon anise oil, to taste), and 1 tablespoon fennel seeds.

Enjoy!

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