Sixteen

Tonight, I am watching a documentary on HLN network by the Naudain brothers. It is on 9/11. It wasn’t intentionally the subject of the film : in fact it was supposed to be about the life of a rookie firefighter.

I have seen this film by Jules and Gideon Naudet two prior times. Each time I see it, my eyes are opened to another aspect about what happened sixteen years ago. I remember being in my office and passing a computer screen showing one of the planes hitting the first building of the World Trade Centers and thinking it was photoshopped. Watching this documentary, I appreciated the poor people on the street who saw it, along with people trying to leave the area and how frightening it was. I thought I was afraid being downtown trying to get home, and here were people jumping to their deaths from the buildings. Tragic!

This film also made me respect, even more than I had, the first responders. They show the firemen they had interviewed, and who died afterward, due to cancer they contracted at the World Trade Center site.

Tonight, as before, I’ll pray for those who passed away, those injured, and all those who lives were touched by this event. It also brings to the front of my consciousness this quote:

“Those who do not read history are doomed to repeat it.” – George Santayana 

Fifteen

Fifteen years…**sigh**

In my previous post, I told you about a documentary on 9/10 on YouTube. In it, one artist did a beautiful time-lapse film from the artist’s lofts in tower one. It was entitled,”One never dies the day before”.

Fifteen years ago, it was the day when thousands of lives were lost: be it World Trade Centers, Pentagon, or in a field in southwestern Pennsylvania, they were gone, families were changed forever, injuries….I could go on and on.

I worked in downtown Philadelphia then and remember, for the first time, being nervous about working in a 7th floor office. I waited with thousands to get public transit home, and never prayed so much in my life. My life and security, like the rest of America, was changed forever.

For the innocent victims of that day, may they have eternal rest.

God bless America.

Bittersweet View

If there is a perk to being laid up for a week, I have caught up with reading and viewing some things  that have been on my to do list.

Keeping in mind that I was a history major in a prior life, I have caught a documentary on YouTube called ” 9/10- The last day of the World Trade Center”.

Knowing what we do now, the documentary takes various views from different people and places in lower Manhattan, and how daily life would never be the same. It does show a crossover of people, on that last day,and their reflection on 9/10 and 9/11.From college students, tv news anchors, terrorists, baggage handlers,relatives of victims, New York artisans who had studio space there, mayoral candidates,among others, I found this a well-done reflection to view before Sunday.

I strongly recommend it.

Once a History Major…

It has been often quoted that those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it. I think Santayana had it right.

I am home with an aching back, trying to take it easy, and I find myself drawn to the Smithsonian channel.I know my husband thinks it’s kind of morose, but I am one of those people who remember where I was when something happened.It started tonight with the Lockerbie Bombing in 1988, which occurred over Scotland the day before my birthday. Now they just did Charlie Hebdo bombing in Paris this past January. Now they are up to 9/11, when I so graphically remember being down town, how would I safely get home, and are my loved ones safe.

It is something that is bittersweet, I would agree.But, even more, it makes me put prayers up for our world.